News & Announcements

Tuesday 03 October 2017

Community Group  •  Bowness Community Group News

Autumn Clean Up on the Banks 
 
Thank you to the Community Payback Team who come on a regular basis to maintain the paths on the Banks. But as we move into autumn it’s also a good time to tidy up and refresh the planting in the beds, and cut back shrubs. Can you give a hour of your time on Sunday 15th October from 10am to help out? Please bring gardening gloves and tools. 
Donations of spare perennial plants you might be splitting in your own autumn garden tidy would also be much appreciated. You could drop any plant donations with Rowena Beaty at Claremont before 15th October. 
 
Litter Collection on the Shore 
The next two litter pick events will be 
• Sunday 1st October at 9.30 am meeting at the Banks shelter 
 
• Saturday 28th October 10 -12 am, meeting beside Shore Gate House. This event is being organised by John Gorrill, a volunteer with Solway AONB, as a follow up to the very successful bonanza on 7th August when 12 volunteers collected 27 bags of rubbish! 
John says : ‘This is a joint event between the Local Community Group and volunteers from Solway AONB, Cumbria Wildlife Trust, Lovemybeach.org and anybody else who wants to help.  If there are enough people with enough energy, we will clear the beach and the salt-marsh as far as the car park at the west end of the village.  Allerdale Borough Council will remove the rubbish in a special collection, so let's make it worth their visit!’ 
 
New Members Wanted! 
 
We are looking for new members to join the Bowness Community Group; would you be interested in finding out more? Our next meeting will be Tuesday 3rd October at Curlews and you are most welcome to come along to join us. In the meantime if you’d like any information about Bowness Community Group, you could speak to any of our current members:  James Graham, Bill Knowles, Maureen McKenna, Claire Allen, Rowena Beaty, Jo Jeeves and Marcia Leonard.
Thursday 21 September 2017

Interest Groups  •  Artists Put Bowness on the Map

Artists and craftspeople in Bowness parish have had a busy summer showing and selling their wares throughout the county and further afield.


Woodturner Jonathan Leach, whose workshop is at Greenspot has plenty of commissions on the go. His large, natural edge bowls are particularly popular and he is sending them as far away as a gallery in South Korea!  His new salt and pepper mills incorporating ceramic internals have proved an absorbing design challenge and his latest project, still on the drawing board, is due to be showcased any day now.


Also selling prolifically online is ceramicist Ben Fosker from Biglands, Bowness. Nearer home, Ben has a continuous display of his pottery at Bardon Mill in Northumberland and this summer has shown work at the Lanercost Priory Exhibition and the Wardlow Mires Pot and Food Fest in Derbyshire. He is currently preparing pieces for a winter exhibition at the Upfront Gallery near Penrith. 


Rowena Beaty, who creates sculptures in stone at her studio at Claremont in Bowness, has this year shown work at the McGill Duncan Gallery in Castle Douglas; Art at the Cathedral in Carlisle; Art at Rose Castle; The Lake Artists Summer Exhibition at Grasmere; Wigton Windows Week and the Solway Arts Exhibition at Fletchertown.


Also exhibiting at Rose Castle, Wigton Windows and the Fletchertown exhibition was Hilary Rose Burt, painter and sculptor, who is establishing herself at The Chapel Studio in Old Anthorn.


Painter Jenny Abbot, whose colourful contemporary paintings are on show at her studio at Sandbagger’s Cottage, Port Carlisle, has been welcoming visitors during this year’s  C-Art Open Studios Exhibition which ran during September.

Monday 18 September 2017

Nature and Wildlife  •  Bowness Beach Clean

Nature and Wildlife  •  Bowness Beach Clean

Saturday 28/10/17 10am - 12 noon

Bowness on Solway beach beside the Shore Gate House.  This is a joint event between the Local Community Group and volunteers from Solway AONB, Cumbria Wildlife Trust, Lovemybeach.org and anybody else who wants to help.  If there are enough people with enough energy, we will clear the beach and the salt-marsh as far as the car park at the west end of the village.  Allerdale Borough Council will remove the rubbish in a special collection, so let's make it worth their visit!
Wednesday 13 September 2017

Interest Groups  •  Game, Set and Match

Anthorn’s new tennis courts have proved their worth in a successful first season. The joint Anthorn and Kirkbride A team finished in third place in the Carlisle and District League, seeing off some strong opposition.
Anthorn club secretary Angela Mawbray said: “The courts are brilliant. Some of the visiting teams are quite envious.”
Also thriving is the junior coaching at Anthorn with professional coach Rob Jefferson. Young players are divided into three age groups for Friday evening sessions during the school summer term. The most proficient are then encouraged to compete in the B team in league matches alongside experienced players.
Overall, ages at the Anthorn club range from four to 72!
The new courts have also attracted non-members who can play on them for a small fee.
Details of next season’s activities will soon be available on the parish website at www.bowness-on-solway.co.uk

 

Friday 01 September 2017

Parish Council  •  Report from draft minutes

Bowness could have two long-awaited cattle grids approved and installed in the coming year, parish councillors heard at their July meeting.
County Councillor Tony Markley gave the good news and also expressed a hope that there would be some County funding for new work at Glasson playground.
He said the Highways Department was about to embark on significant road work in the next year which could result in local traffic disruption.
Members heard that planners had granted permission for the developer Ian Hunter to create shepherds hut holiday accommodation on the former orchard at Bowness House Farm. The parish council had objected to this proposal.
After the establishment of a defibrillator in Bowness, there are now moves to acquire them for Glasson and Anthorn, and the council heard it may be approached with funding requests.
The problem of providing land for burials in the parish was discussed. Extra land will soon be needed and members heard that St Michael’s church council had approached a local landowner concerning an adjacent piece of land to be used for a burial ground extension.
The council heard that, if it fell to them to assume responsibility to maintain a burial ground, this would require a great deal of time, work and funding. Councillors are to monitor the ongoing situation.
* This report is taken from draft minutes which will be considered for approval at the council’s next meeting on September 13 at 7pm at the Lindow Hall, Bowness.

 

Saturday 19 August 2017

Other  •  www.bowness-on-solway.co.uk The First Six Months

Other  •  www.bowness-on-solway.co.uk  The First Six Months

Using Google Analytics, we are able to report that the parish website has had an encouraging first sixth months in terms of traffic and hits.  

The website has had over 5000 views, with 63% of these being returning visitors and 37% new visitors. Of these, 72% of visitors were from the UK, and the remainder from overseas.  

This illustrates how much worldwide interest there is in our area.


The website has great potential to communicate locally and with a wider audience and promote the area, so if you have any material to share for the site, or information about events and attractions, please do get in contact with us with the details at info@bowness-on-solway.co.uk, or call Lyn or Andy on 016973 51055.


Thanks to all those who have contributed photos and articles to the site so far, and keep it coming!

 

Friday 18 August 2017

Interest Groups  •  Remembering the Solway

Interest Groups  •  Remembering the Solway

A project to collect, share and celebrate the memories of life and landscape on the Solway Plain.

Set up in 2013 as one of 29 projects within the Solway Wetlands Landscape Partnership, this Heritage Lottery supported scheme aimed to capture and record some of the living memories of people living on the Solway throughout the last century.

A free booklet is now available from a number of local outlets (Kirkbride Shop, St Michael's Church, Wallsend Guest House among them) which includes excerpts and photographs from the project.

For further details see www.solwaywetlands.org.uk

Friday 18 August 2017

Local Links  •  That's Cumbria TV

Local Links  •  That's Cumbria TV

Have you seen the new local TV Channel called That's Cumbria on Freeview Channel 8?

Tuesday 08 August 2017

Bowness  •  AONB Beach Clean

Bowness  •  AONB Beach Clean

Volunteers from the AONB and local people collected 27 bags of rubbish plus items too big for bags yesterday on Bowness waterfront. The AONB volunteers hope to return in September for another event - watch this space for dates.

This is not just a local problem as we  are at a narrow point in the Solway, so every tide forces more rubbish onto the shore.  It could be from anywhere on the coast, the Isle of Man, the Irish Sea or the Atlantic. 

 
Thanks to all who helped make such a positive difference to the shore yesterday.
Saturday 05 August 2017

Nature and Wildlife  •  A New View of The Parish

Nature and Wildlife  •  A New View of The Parish

Work is underway to create a £150,000, 850-metre boardwalk across Glasson Moss linking the new observation tower to the Kirkbride to Bowness road. 
Contractors are carrying out the work on behalf of Natural England and the Solway Wetland Project  to give overall public access to the parish’s precious wetland areas which, in the past, were very difficult to access.
The new Glasson walkway, funded by the National Lottery, is made of recycled plactic boarding with a lifespan on 40 to 50 years. It will be entered from the Bowness road end via a new layby, giving easy access to wheelchair users. The boardwalk, which could not be started until the end of the bird breeding season, is expected to be completed by the end of August.
The observation tower stands at the end of the track that goes past the caravan park at Glasson. Built at a cost of £40,000 from sturdy materials it measures five metres from ground to platform and  gives a commanding view of the moss, Criffel and Skiddaw. 
It is designed to accommodate 20 ‘large’ people says Alasdair Brock, Natural England’s Senior Reserve Officer for North Cumbria.
“Because there are no raised features in the vicinity to give an overall view of the bog, the tower is there to allow visitors to see the entire bog and its wildlife, to see how the bog interfaces with the land around it, and to give a spectacular view of the whole setting,” he said.
“Similar towers have been built in flat areas where there are raised bogs in countries like Sweden and Lithuania.”
“The boardwalk links in with the path to Rogersceugh and the boardwalks on the Bowness Moss. Our idea is to consolidate all the footpaths in the area.”
*If you have any queries or spot any issues on the nature reserves, you can contact Alasdair on 07771 530019.

Saturday 29 July 2017

Other  •  Bell Raid and Skiff Building

Everyone a winner on bell raid day
Bowness residents turned out in force last month to repel an invasion by the Scots. But despite their heavy armoury of water pistols, the Cumbrians failed to stop the seaborne raiders from ‘capturing’ the Bowness church bell.
This re-enactment of the actual bell raid back in 1626, when the thieving Scots, fleeing their pursuers, dropped the precious bell in the middle of the estuary, has now become a thrilling annual event.
Dozens turned up on the shore to watch the four rowing boats, manned by crews totalling 20 brave souls, make their way across from Annan on a full tide in near-perfect conditions. The rowers were accompanied on the journey by three rescue boats from Annan and two from Silloth.
After a ‘hostile’ reception on the shore by children from Bowness School wielding water pistols, the Scots planted their national flags on either side of the replica bell, which has now been taken overland to Annan to be displayed in their primary school until next year’s raid.
The crews - two of whom were from Annan, one from the Clyde and one from Alnmouth in Northumberland - were then treated to generous refreshments of hot soup, hot drinks, sausage rolls and delicious cakes provided in Bowness School by PTA members. 
The sale of refreshments to sightseers, plus stalls and a raffle in the school hall raised £350 for school funds
On the tide of enthusiasm...
Inspired by the raid and the fact that the two Annan rowing boats were built by their own community, several people from Bowness are now keen to have a community-built boat on this side of the Solway.
 The skiff could then be used to compete in rowing races with similar home-built boats around the British Isles, all operating under the Association of Coastal Rowing Teams.
The Association sells a kit inclu8ding materials and instructions for the body of the boat, though some extras and a trailer would also be needed. 
The project would require:
*funding,
*skilled volunteers to oversee work on the boat,
*enthusiastic helpers,
*a large building to accommodate the work
*a crew of oarsmen to row it.
The Annan team was headed by a professional boatbuilder and had help from young people in the area. Their experts have offered to give help and advice to anyone starting a Bowness project as Annan is keen to have a nearby rowing crew to race with.
*Anyone in the Bowness parish interested in building a boat, offering support or forming a rowing team please contact the Bowness website by emailing info@bowness-on-solway.co.uk 
*For more information about the two Annan boats and pictures of their construction visit: http://annanharbouractiongroup.btck.co.uk/SkiffBuilding

 

Saturday 29 July 2017

Other  •  Excerpt from News and Star feature on Bowness by Roger Lytoliis 20th July 2017 www.newsandstar.co.uk

Bowness-on-Solway will be invaded by Scots this Sunday. But the invaders have been kind enough to give notice of their arrival. And those on the receiving end are inviting them to lunch.
This is the village’s annual ‘bell raid’. It re-enacts a raid from 1626 when a group of people from Annan rowed across the narrow strip of the Solway to Bowness, where they stole the bells from St Michael’s Church.
This was seen as the ultimate insult because of the church’s position at the heart of the community.
The raid proved ill-fated. On the way back, the bells were thrown overboard and never recovered.
Since 2014 the invasion has been re-enacted in a much friendlier spirit than the original. Members of Annan Harbour Action Group are among the raiders. Alan Thomson is the group’s harbour development officer.
“We made a mess of the original raid,” says Alan of his Annan ancestors. “The legend says that because of either bad weather or too much drink, the bells were endangering the Scots’ boat on the way back so they threw them overboard.
“This year we’re hoping to take at least four boats, possibly five. They’re all skiffs. Our new one, Pride of the Solway, was constructed by our volunteers with help from Annan Academy pupils and young people from the Step Together project.”
Each boat has a crew of four and a cox. They will head across the Solway estuary shortly after noon, to take advantage of high tide. “We need high water to get to Bowness or we’ll be walking across half a mile of mud,” says Alan.
“We’ve got to come down a couple of miles of the River Annan first. Across the estuary it’s only about one and a quarter miles to Bowness. It takes about 40 minutes, including the river.”
By road it’s 30 miles from Annan to Bowness. In 1626 a party from Bowness took the direct route across the estuary when they retaliated for the Scots’ raid.
“Raiders from Bowness then crossed the Solway themselves and stole the bells from the churches at Dornock and Middlebie. To this day, when there’s a new minister at Dornock he writes a polite letter to Bowness asking for his bell back. And they write a polite letter back, telling him to get lost!”
For the past three years the Scottish raiders have met resistance from Bowness folk armed with water pistols. They then receive a warmer welcome. Alan says: “Bowness School are going to host us for lunch. We’ve offered to give them some help with their Viking projects. Our skiffs are similar to Viking boats. We only live a mile apart – it’s crazy that we don’t interact a bit more."
Alan is keen to see Bowness and perhaps Port Carlisle and Burgh by Sands build their own community boats with a view to Solway rowing races. The boats are all built to the same traditional Scandinavian design.
While Alan and his colleagues are looking forward to Sunday’s mock invasion, he claims to have even bigger plans for the 400th anniversary of the bell raid in 2026. “We’re definitely going to take the bells back that year!” he laughs.



Electric cars may be kings of the road one day. But not yet. At least not in Bowness.
Wallsend Guest House had a Renault Twizy – a battery-powered two-seat electric car – for hire.
Last month owners Lyn and Andy Lewis dispensed with it and bought a minibus instead.
“It was fantastic,” says Lyn of the Twizy. “It felt like you were doing hell on wheels at 50 miles an hour!
“It’s a real head turner. But it’s maybe more of a city thing.”
She thinks the terrain around the Solway Plain may not have been the most suitable for the vehicle.
Then there’s the fact that its range is only about 50 miles in an area not blessed with a huge number of charging points.
Lyn and Andy have one. But...
“It’s been used three times in four years,” says Lyn. “It’s not exactly been a sensation. The technology is too new for most people.”
She is hopeful that the electric car’s time may come again.
For the moment, she and Alan have just invested in a minibus. This is mainly for guests, but the wider community could benefit.
“It’s private hire, mainly just for our residential guests and those staying at the other B&Bs in the village at the moment. We may extend this in future depending on demand.
“It has a private hire licence so it could be available. Public transport is non-existent on Sundays and bank holidays. The Stagecoach 93 bus does not run to Bowness then.”
This is Lyn’s eighth year in the village after moving up from Southport where she ran a special school. Andy was a marine engineer.
They took over Wallsend Guest House after falling in love with Bowness and the building: the old rectory.
The Wallsend has a licensed tea room, open from Easter until October.
There are also several well-equipped wooden Wigwam cabins on an adjacent campsite.

The 84-mile Hadrian’s Wall Trail begins – or ends – at Bowness-on-Solway.
Some set off from here, occasionally with one for the road.
Others arrive here after several days on their feet.
“It’s half and half,” says landlady Pamela Behan.
“People say this is a nicer way to finish than at Wallsend. Everybody has a good crack about what they’ve done.”
Where do they come from?
“They come from all over the world. Every nationality. Americans. Dutch. Finland. Austria. Canada.
“We have a book that people sign. We sit and look at it. Some people write an essay. Some just write a few words. One drew a wall.
“My daughter walked the wall two years ago. She was fine. My daughter-in-law did it and her feet were one big blister.
“Some people are ready to collapse when they get here. For some it’s a warm-up. We had people who were going to do the Three Peaks two days later.”
Has Pamela walked the wall herself?
“I haven’t got time! I’m usually in the kitchen. I feel I have done it because my daughter talks about it so much.”
She says people walking the wall are the biggest proportion of her pub’s business.
“You can’t expect the locals to come in every night. The locals keep us going through the winter.”
The King’s Arms’ location is also apparent in its menu.
This includes salmon caught from the Solway by local haaf netters.
Plans to extend the kitchen and dining room have been approved.
“Work will start when the tourist season ends in October,” says Pamela.
“We’re hoping it will be done for the start of the next season in March.”

Bowness has a new ancient building.
What sounds like a contradiction is a recreation of a dabbin, or cottage.
This has been built in the RSPB reserve at Campfield Marsh, just west of Bowness.
The dabbin has clay walls, timber beams and a thatched roof. Similar structures have been built in the area since the 15th century.
More than 1,000 volunteers, including 150 children from seven local schools, took part in the year-long project.
It was supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and managed by the Solway Wetlands Landscape Partnership.
Chris Spencer is project manager for the partnership.
He said: “We wanted this to be a project about education and heritage but we wanted it to be challenging and fun as well.
“It’s a celebration both of local vernacular architecture and the local community coming together to create something so significant.”
The dabbin is the first to be built in Cumbria in more than 100 years. Almost all the material used came from the local area, including 250 tons of clay lifted from a nearby pond.
The dabbin is open every day and can be found in the discovery zone at RSPB Campfield Marsh. Entry is free.

Sunday 23 July 2017

Bowness  •  Annan Bell Riad

Bowness  •  Annan Bell Riad Bowness  •  Annan Bell Riad Bowness  •  Annan Bell Riad Bowness  •  Annan Bell Riad Bowness  •  Annan Bell Riad

Images from today's bell raid.  Four boats rowed across from Annan, supported by several safety boats and the Silloth RNLI crew.

Thursday 13 July 2017

Bowness  •  Annan Skiff Launch

Bowness  •  Annan Skiff Launch Bowness  •  Annan Skiff Launch Bowness  •  Annan Skiff Launch

The second skiff produced by the skilled boat builders of Annan took to the water on July 13th out of Annan Harbour.  This boat  - Pride of the Solway - will take part in the annual Bell Raid on Sunday July 23rd from Annan to Bowness.

Anyone interested in going out with the Annan crew for some rowing practice on Saturday 22nd?  Please contact Lyn Lewis on 016973 51055 if you'd like to join them.

Saturday 01 July 2017

Health  •  Community First Responder Training

Disappointingly, the taster session scheduled for Monday July 10th at the Lindow Hall has been cancelled by the Northwest Ambulance Service as below:-

I have been asked to contact you regarding establishing a new CFR Team at Bowness on Solway. Unfortunately we are not recruiting new CFR Teams at present but would like to thank you for your interest.

We are currently consolidating the teams that we do have currently and we will review the situation later in the year around Autumn.

Christopher Hyde
Community Resuscitation Manager 
Cumbria & Lancashire Areas.

NorthWest Ambulance Service NHS Trust

Friday 16 June 2017

Services  •  High Speed Braodband

Services  •  High Speed Braodband Services  •  High Speed Braodband
Friday 16 June 2017

Agendas & Minutes  •  Parish Council Minutes (Notes)

Bowness Parish Council heard at its May meeting that St Michael’s Church is gradually running out of burial space in the graveyard,


The church council has approached the parish council, which already provides financial help to maintain the churchyard, with a suggestion that the parish council might acquire some land in the village to provide additional burial space.
Councillors are to consider the matter at their July meeting.


Members heard that Allerdale and Cumbria County Councils had approved the planning application to convert the buildings at Bowness House Farm into holiday lets, a cafe and a Hadrian’s Wall heritage centre, but that two new, related applications had just been received and would be considered under the council’s Standing Orders procedure.


Allerdale and Cumbria had also given the go-ahead to Natural England for a boardwalk across  Glasson Moss nature reserve.
But they had turned down a request to create a tea room at Pear Tree Farm.


A request by Glasson Community Association for £2,540 was deferred until later in the year so that councillors could see the outcome of the association’s requests for funding from other sources.


County Councillor Tony Markley told parish councillors that their long-running bid to acquire funding for cattle grids at Bowness may begin to make more progress following the May county council elections.


* This report is taken from draft minutes which will be considered for approval at the July meeting.

Saturday 03 June 2017

Nature and Wildlife  •  From Mhairi at the RSPB

Spring has sprung on the Reserve and whatever airspeed velocity they were travelling at we welcomed our first swallows back to Campfield Marsh at the beginning of April.  Also joining us in the UK from their long migration are house martins, sand martins and swifts which are generally the last to return. 

It can be a little tricky to distinguish between the 4 birds when they a swooping whizzing above your head. All of them migrate to the U.K. from Africa in the spring to breed and raise their young then around September time they about turn and make the journey back again to escape our cold winters. It is little wonder that people long ago thought that swallows actually hibernated for winter reappearing from their slumber in time for spring. Of course we know now that this doesn’t happen and with bird ringing we have learnt more and more about their migration habits.

On the 5th of March we had a group of swifts fly past out on the estuary.  A group of swifts are collectively known as a scream and if you have every heard them overhead you’ll realise what a descriptive name this is. Their large black wings 3 times their body length make them an unmistakable silhouette in a clear sky. 

One of the most iconic harbingers of spring is perhaps the cuckoo and more specifically its distinct call. On the 4th of May our volunteers on the way to help tidy up some recently laid hedges at Rogersceugh Farm were given the first record of the year.  

The BTO have recently radio tagged several cuckoos one of which is called Larry who was tagged in the Forest of Bowland. ‘Larry’ has his own blog and map to show his migration – according this he arrived at his breeding grounds on 7 May just a few days behind our sighting. If you want to learn more about the radio tagged Cuckoos and their amazing migration have a look on the BTO website. 

We’d like to invite everyone to our Discovery Day at RSPB Campfield Marsh on Sunday the 28th May from 10.30-4.00pm. Much like other years, there will be an exciting range of activities running including bird box building, pond dipping, bug hunting and more. There will be refreshments available throughout the day and you can even visit our plant and book stalls to pick up a bargain.  It’s set to be a great day and we look forward to seeing you there!

Oh and finally after a couple of hours of social media training we’ve been let loose on the RSPB Northern England Twitter Account.....have a look for news and pictures from Campfield Marsh, St Bees Head and Hodbarrow @RSPB_N_England.  

Monday 15 May 2017

Interest Groups  •  Bowness on Solway Parish Website

Interest Groups  •  Bowness on Solway Parish Website

Your website is now up and running and is ready to accept news and announcements, diary dates and events, photos and features.  In particular, we would like to invite content from the many interest groups in the parish.  

The website provides an exciting, responsive platform for communicating within the parish, but also for people outside the area, and indeed worldwide.


If you are part of a group who would like to write an introductory piece about your organisation, together with details of any forthcoming events, or simply your regular meeting arrangements, please forward the details to info@bowness-on-solway.co.uk, or via post to Lyn Lewis, Wallsend Guest House, Bowness on Solway, CA7 5AF.


We also have the facility to do emailshots to those who have subscribed to receive information on the website, so can send out information about your events and reminders as appropriate.


We look forward to hearing from you.

 

Monday 15 May 2017

Bowness  •  Defibrillator Awareness Training

Bowness  •  Defibrillator Awareness Training

The two training sessions held at the School and Lindow Hall recently were attended by 25 people.  Lauren Watson from the Northwest Ambulance Service trained everyone in the use of CPR and the defibrillator in the event of a cardiac arrest.  Whilst the defibrillator can be used by anyone, it is good to know that so many people were able to attend the training and now feel confident to use it if needed.
Survival rates for patients receiving this emergency intervention rise to up to 80% (from 3% for those who do not) so we are in a very fortunate position to have the defibrillator available in the village.  
Approximately 60,000 people suffer an out of hospital cardiac arrest every year in the UK and currently only 1 in 10 people will survive.
Lauren also explained the need for more First Responders in rural communities such as ours.  She will be invited back to explain this role in more detail in the future to all those interested in becoming part of a local team.  If you would like to register your interest in becoming a First Responder, please contact Lyn Lewis on 016973 51055.

 

Monday 15 May 2017

Glasson  •  Haaf Netting - The Fight Goes On

 


As the haaf-netting season gets underway this month, the Solway fishermen are still fighting to preserve their centuries-old tradition.
Mark Messenger, chairman of the haaf-netters’ association, is continuing to negotiate with the Environment Agency for the right to use nets in the Solway. The two sides have until the end of this year to reach an agreement otherwise the sport will be governed by a national by-law making its future even less certain.
The Environment Agency claim stocks of salmon in the Eden are low, but Mark refutes that. He says the agency is encouraging more people to fish with rods while the haaf-netters are subject to tight restrictions.
This season the haaf-netters are allowed to fish between 10am and 10pm on weekdays only and can keep just 10 salmon per season.
Mark says: Rod fishermen and riperian owners on the Eden are a wealthier, more powerful lobby than us but we will carry on pushing for our rights. We are the only place left in the world where haaf-netting is practised.”

 

Wednesday 05 April 2017

Bowness  •  Annan Bell Raid

Bowness  •  Annan Bell Raid Bowness  •  Annan Bell Raid Bowness  •  Annan Bell Raid

The Scots are coming!


Watch out Bowness – marauding Scots are planning a new invasion!
A fleet of boats will be heading across the Solway estuary on Sunday, July 23 to carry out the now-annual Bowness Bell Raid.
The raid commemorates the original theft in 1626 when a gang of Scotsmen took the bells from St Michael’s Church in retaliation for an earlier raid by Cumbrians of Scottish bells. In the chase that followed, the Bowness bells were thrown overboard and to this day lie at the bottom of the Bell Pool in the Solway at Annan.
In  recent years the dastardly theft has been re-enacted and the Scottish raiders met by fierce Bowness folk armed with water pistols.
The confrontation ends amicably with refreshments provided by Bowness School PTA before the invaders head home with a replica bell.
The raid has become an important date in the calendar of the Annan Harbour Events and Activities group who enjoy the chance to show off their community-made skiff ‘The Pride of Annan’.
The mini Viking boat, built by local craftsmen assisted by young enthusiasts, is one of 186 similar craft made by coastal communities round Britain who then compete in coastal rowing races..
Annan is already at work on a second boat the Harbour Development Officer Alan Thomson is keen to see Bowness and perhaps Port Carlisle and Burgh by Sands build their own community boats with a view to regular Solway rowing races.
The boats, which take four oarsmen (or women) and a cox, are all built to the same traditional Scandinavian pattern, designed by a boatbuilder on the Isle of Skye.
Alan says: “All you need is the kit, one craftsman and plenty of enthusiasts.
*Pictures and more information about the Annan boats can be found at annanharbouractiongroup.btck.co.uk/SkiffBuilding
* Anyone interested in building and/or rowing a Bowness boat can register their interest on the parish website at info@bowness-on-solway.co.uk

Tuesday 04 April 2017

Bowness  •  Spring Tidying at The Banks

We are holding a gardening morning at The Banks on Sunday 23rd April, starting at 9.30a.m. Come and join us -  even half an hour of your time would be most welcome. Please bring your own gardening tools. Help us make the official start of the Hadrian's Wall Trail look good for the new season!  (Please note this is a re-scheduling of the previous date.)

Tuesday 04 April 2017

St Michaels Church  •  What Grand Fellers!

St Michaels Church  •  What Grand Fellers!

Pictured are the team headed by Mike Waning (front left) who took down a large, multi-trunked fir tree in Bowness churchyard which was threatening to fall on gravestones.
A hard Sunday afternoon’s work was put in by Mike and his family – Hannah, Mikey and Robbie – as well as Richard, John, Joseph and Jonathan Wills, Anna and James Paisely and Fenella  Watson.
A useful seat was carved out of the huge tree stump near the smuggler’s grave.

 

Sunday 19 March 2017

Bowness  •  Defibrillator

Bowness  •  Defibrillator

The Defibrillator is now installed and  'Rescue Ready' and linked to the North West Ambulance Service.  The equipment is mounted on the front wall of Wallsend Guest House.  Please do call in and see the equipment if you would like to.  

Wednesday 22 February 2017

Transport  •  New Book for Users of the Stagecoach 93 Bus Service

Transport  •  New Book for Users of the Stagecoach 93 Bus Service

The latest book from Cardurnock-based author and publisher, Geoffrey Lindop, aims to boost the local tourist economy.

He writes, 'I am anxious to maintain the bus service through Cardurnock and West Common. I am impressed at how, in the summer months, many tourists intent on walking The Hadrian's Wall Path subsidise the service between Bowness and Carlisle. It occurred to me that the 93 Bus service passes the 'doorstep' of three nature reserves between Anthorn and Bowness and a further three nature reserves on the rest of the route. I have therefore written a book to encourage eco-tourism in the area. This may also encourage naturalists to use the service during the winter months to witness the wild geese as well as the rest of the year.'

It will be published in April this year under the title 'Exploring the Bowness-on-Solway Peninsular on the 93 Bus Service with the subtitle Stagecoach took me on a Wild Goose Chase'. 

The book will be on sale through Amazon.co.uk from April priced at £9.95 and a description of the book is now available at www.createspace.com/6510786 where American tourists will be able to purchase it for $11.99 and it will also be available through Amazon's other outlets throughout the world priced in their local currency as well as other booksellers and local outlets. 

Part One of the book is a commentary on what to see through the bus window. Bus stop walks are described in Part Two. Walkers who use their automobile to reach far-flung destinations, have to make circular walks that bring them back to their parked car, but with a bus stop walk they can leave the bus at one stop, enjoy a pleasant walk, and rejoin the service at the next bus stop. Readers are encouraged to make their final bus stop near one of the many public houses where they can enjoy food and drink (and a comfort break) whilst awaiting the arrival of the bus. 

The third part of the book describes the history of the region. There are sections on the Romans, Church history with a description of each church and chapel, the last journey of Edward-I, and the canal/railway with photographs of each station taken at the start of the 20th century. 

Each of the nature reserves are described in Part Four and the final part consists of miscellaneous items with which the author would like some help. 

'The basic rule of writing,' said Geoffrey, 'is that you write with enthusiasm on a subject close to your heart. There are a wide variety of individuals that have established businesses along the bus route and quite frankly I am not qualified to write authoritatively about their business. I would like them write a few words on their pet subject and fire the reader's imagination in such a way to say "Hey that is interesting I would really like to spend time in that (B&B, Pub, shop, whatever) and discuss it further." Maybe it is a favourite recipe, a craft, where to see wildlife, or simply blathering about old times. Anything that makes their establishment or the area in general different from the ordinary will be of interest to my readers and encourage them to spend money in the local economy.' 

The book will be revised and reprinted at frequent intervals, so if you are a business that has missed the first edition and would like to promote your business in the future please contact geoffrey@mercianotes.com who will be pleased to hear from you.

Tuesday 14 February 2017

Glasson  •  New Village Shop

Glasson  •  New Village Shop Glasson  •  New Village Shop Glasson  •  New Village Shop

Aunty Pat’s Country store is open for business. The parish’s newest retail outlet, situated behind the Highland Laddie pub in Glasson, opened its doors at the beginning of February.

Proprietor Mark Messenger, who also runs the pub, has named the grocery shop after his mum, a former nurse and popular school dinner lady, who was known by all as Aunty Pat.

The smart new shop, soon to have its own sign, was prompted by the loss to the area of Gordon Waning’s milk and paper round and of Bruce’s grocery van.

As well as its mainstays of milk, bread and daily papers, the store stocks a wide range of tinned food and dry goods, drinks, including wine, toiletries, cleaning materials, non-prescription medicines, fresh fruit and veg, eggs, bacon and home-baked scones and cakes, made in the adjacent pub kitchen.

“The veg and eggs are all locally sourced,” says Mark. “We hope soon to add a range of savoury pies from the basic mince and carrot to gourmet pies such as venison in red wine.”

A staff of three part-time assistants run the shop, which is open seven days a week 8am to 6pm (and you can knock on the pub door after that!), all with the support of Mark, who also oversees the running of the Bush Inn in Kirkbride and is very active in the haaf-netting organisation.

How does he do it all? “Fortunately I’ve got really good staff in each place – they all join in and do a bit of everything,” he says.

The shop building was already part of the pub premises – it simply required new flooring and shop fittings.

Mark is delighted with the initial response to the venture and hopes it will gather momentum with the influx of summer visitors to the area.

One of the attractive features of the store for single householders is the offer of small quantities, such as a quarter of a cabbage or half a turnip. “It’s no problem,” says Mark. “If there’s any left over we can use it in the pub kitchen.”

* For more information contact Mark on 51839.

Lucilla Laval

Sunday 12 February 2017

Anthorn  •  New Life For Anthorn

 Anthorn sisters Kelly Skinner and Angela Crozier are at the heart of big plans to revitalise village activities – but they need help.


Kelly and Angela are, respectively, chair and secretary of Anthorn Community Association which is poised to breathe new life into the village. The association was formed in 1972  and gave rise to a vibrant community life but it has struggled for support in recent years.


 The group is now staging annual Christmas and Halloween parties, working closely with the village hall and playpark committees.


They have introduced regular pizza nights where home-made pizzas and pasta dishes, prepared on site by That Pizza Place, can be eaten in the hall or as takeaways.


Another plan in its early stages is for a playgroup for toddlers in the area.


A summer sports day is on the cards and a bonfire party is on the wish list although health and safety regulations make this more challenging.
Art, craft and archery classes for both adults and children may be set up, using the talents of local experts.
Also for adults, a quiz night is a distinct possibility.


The association is actively supporting the project to mark the 60th anniversary of the last official flight from the airfield which gave rise to the estate at Anthorn – the Royal Naval Air Station HMS Nuthatch.


But the priority for all the village groups is to update and refurbish the hall – the centre of activities – which was built during World War Two for the wives and families of the servicemen at HMS Nuthatch.
“It was built to last,” says Kelly, “but it urgently needs decorated and smartened up.”
Offers of materials and labour would be very welcome.


“We want all our activities to be open to anyone in the parish – not just families in Anthorn,” Kelly says. “We want to foster a new sense of community.”


Anyone able to help with any of these schemes can contact Kelly on 52844 (email kelly-skinner08@hotmail.co.uk) or Angela on 51815 (email pub_stella@yahoo.co.uk)


*The hall is available for private hire at just £5 an hour. Ring 51486.


Lucilla Laval

 

Wednesday 01 February 2017

History  •  What do you know about where you live?

As one of the first projects for the website, why not tell us about the history of the house you live in and send us some photos, old and new.  We can build up an important resource for the parish in the history section.

Tuesday 31 January 2017

Education  •  Bowness Parent and Toddler Group

Meets on Wednesdays during term time 13:30 to 15:00 at Bowness Pre-School.

Parents and carers welcome with children from birth.  Come along for a coffee and a chat, with songs and stories for the little ones.

£2 per family.

Contact Catherine Servante on 016973 51934/07891 376940

Tuesday 31 January 2017

St Michaels Church  •  Regular Sunday Services

Sunday Services

 

Kirkbride Newton Arlosh Bowness
1st  09:30 HC 10:45 HC 18:30 EP
2nd 09:30 HC 10:45 MP 11:00 HC
3rd 09:30 HC 10:45 HC 11:00 MP
4th 09:30 HC   11:00 HC

 

Wednesday 25 January 2017

Contribute to your website

Contribute to your website

If you would like to add some content to the website, documents, photos, articles, news items etc, please email us using the link on the home page.  If you would like us to collect items on loan for scanning and uploading, please contact us and we'll be happy to help.

Tuesday 24 January 2017

Bowness  •  Community Defibrillator

Bowness  •  Community Defibrillator

Funding to pay for a defibrillator for use by the community has now been agreed, with contributions from the Parish Council and Cumbria County Council. Many thanks also to Lyn and Andy Lewis for their donations of funds from the September Race Night, and Jan and Dave Milne; this will be spent on training in the use of the equipment and its ongoing maintenance. The defibrillator will be supplied by the Community Heartbeat Trust, and training sessions will be provided. It is planned to site the defibrillator on the front wall of Wallsend Guest House, where it can be monitored by CCTV. Watch this space for more information on training opportunities.

Tuesday 17 January 2017

Bowness Christmas Tree

Bowness Christmas Tree

 

 

A sparkling success

Bowness put extra sparkle into Christmas this year with a magnificent festive tree on glebe land just down the road from the church.

The ‘village’ tree was the brainchild of Bowness Community Group and it was launched at a delightful evening of carol singing, mulled wine, roast chestnuts and mince pies on December the second.


The 15ft tree was transported to the site from a forest near Spadeadam by community group member James Graham. Other members supplies some of the refreshments and the overall hosts were Lyn and Andy Lewis who made their festively-decorated grounds available for the evening.

The lights were switched on by guest of honour Gordon Waning on the eve of his retirement as milkman and newspaper delivery man.

About 40 people joined in the carols and chatted, ate and drank around a welcoming brazier outside the guest house.

The event was so successful that it is hoped the village tree will now become an annual Christmas fixture.

LL

Tuesday 17 January 2017

Gordon Waning's Retirement

Gordon Waning's Retirement

 

 

The end of an era

Life just isn’t the same in 2017 for hundreds of households up and down the Solway coast. Families don’t wake to the clink of milk bottles on the doorstep or the thud of the daily paper on the mat.

The community has lost its milkman and newspaper delivery man of 29 years after Gordon Waning took well-earned retirement on Christmas Eve.

Gordon bought the milk round 29 years ago come April and built it up to around 240 customers on a route stretching from Kirkbride along the coast to Burgh by Sands and detouring to Easton, Finglandrigg, Glasson and Whitrigg.

His working day began at half past midnight when he delivered his first round of milk in Kirkbride. At around 2.45am he went into Carlisle to collect the day’s papers from wholesalers Menzies. Then he started on the bulk of the round, finishing between 8.30 and 10am depending on whether it was Cumberland News Day – and how many customers wanted to chat!

This was a seven-day-a-week job in all weathers and in all those years and Gordon, now aged 65, has missed just six days due to ill health.

Gordon also delivered eggs, cream, orange juice and potatoes as well as the 25 gallons of milk he supplied daily.

For very elderly customers he often took their paper and milk right into the house and for some he was the only person they saw that day.

In his time on the road he often saw suspicious activities in the hours when most people were asleep, and alerted the police. Twice he raised the alarm when he suspected a customer had died.

Gordon began his working life digging peat on the moss and later worked as a builder’s labourer and a parcels delivery driver.

But the milk round suited him just fine. “I love the job, he said. “I’d still be doing it now if my health was good enough. I’ve had good customers, no bad debts, and made a lot of friends.”
 
Gordon isn’t ready for his armchair and slippers yet. He’s considering taking a part-time job as a driver or in the building trade  - once he’s mastered the art of sleeping through the night.

Tuesday 17 January 2017

Parish Council News

Parish council news

A report on Superfast Broadband for Bowness was given to the parish council at the November meeting. Council clerk Mike Abbs and chairman James Graham had been to a meeting at Cockermouth organised by MP Sue Hayman and attended by senior British Telecom staff. They heard that work was ongoing at Glasson and it was hoped Bowness would soon have superfast access.

After hearing a financial report, members agreed that the precept – the amount the parish council asks Allerdale to collect through the rates – should remain at £18,784.

Payments agreed by the council included £400 towards the cost of  running the toilet facilities at Lindow Hall and £400 towards the design of the forthcoming parish website.

Saturday 14 January 2017

New Website for Bowness on Solway Parish

We are delighted to launch the newly developed website for the parish.

To contribute or comment, please email us at info@bowness-on-solway.co.uk

We welcome any articles, photos or materials for sharing with the community and the many visitors to the area